Clinics & Recitals


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Recent school visits include:

  • Baylor University
  • Binghamton University
  • Bowling Green University
  • Capital University
  • Cincinnati College Conservatory of Music
  • Eastern Kentucky University
  • Furman University
  • Indiana University of Pennsylvania
  • Ithaca College
  • Mars Hill College
  • Morehead State University
  • Oberlin Conservatory
  • Ohio University
  • Roosevelt University
  • Sam Houston State University
  • Stetson University
  • The Peabody Institute
  • Texas State University
  • University of Akron
  • University of Central Arkansas
  • University of Kentucky
  • University of South Carolina
  • University of Tennessee
  • University of Texas – Arlington
  • Virginia Tech
  • West Virginia University
  • Wright State University

I love visiting universities as a guest recitalist and clinician.   Each studio is as unique as its individual students, and I work closely with the professor(s) to tailor my presentations to the students’ needs.  Coaching students on solos, etudes, excerpts, chamber music, and career building is something on which I thrive, and students grow tremendously.

Another program that I offer universities is a Career Development Seminar that applies to all music students.  Throughout my guest visits – not to mention my own education – I have found that the majority of graduating music students are grossly underprepared for the real world of surviving as a musician.  My presentation targets this exact issue, and encourages students to begin thinking creatively about building their careers.  I have presented this seminar to considerable acclaim for classes of 200+ students, many of whom told me afterwards that they never even considered many of my points.  The summary below most accurately describes the purpose and goals of this Seminar.

 

Gainfully Unemployed: finding musical success post-graduation. A guide on surviving and thriving as a musician.

While there are no guarantees of finding success or making a living in any field, it is an uncontested truth that finding sustainable work as a musician is more difficult than most other fields.  Making a living as a musician is possible, but it takes discipline, creativity, and unwavering commitment to your craft.  Some students graduate and win auditions with professional, full-time ensembles.  Others are awarded teaching positions, from the kindergarten level to university professors.  Many will find themselves working as the unsung heroes of the music world: administrators, stage managers, composers, historians, librarians, and a plethora of other possibilities of which you and I are probably unaware.  Yet for many of us, going from the student world to obtaining a full-time position within our field is not something arrived at immediately, or without significant work and creativity.

The word “freelance” often carries a negative connotation, as many people think that freelancers are just folks who never won an audition or teaching job, or became lazy in their pursuit of otherwise full-time employment.  That is hardly the case.  However, the skill-set required for success is much more involved than most musicians are capable.  Through this seminar, my goal is to make you aware of these skills and the possibilities that exist, while igniting your creativity to develop ideas that will help you find success.  Not only will I outline ways to develop your musical career, but also show you ways to continue to grow as a musician. If you are interested in having me visit your school, please click here to contact me.

TESTIMONIALS

Timothy Anderson
Trombone Professor, College-Conservatory of Music, University of Cincinnati

Tim Smith provided our students and faculty with a professional performance and approach to practice and mental preparation that is not usually showcased in orchestral player master classes.  He was very approachable and personable with the students.  He offered solutions that were based on experience and wisdom, not just the usual textbook answers.  I hope to have him visit CCM again in the near future.  He made my job better.”

Daniel Cloutier, DMA
Assttant  Professor of Trombone, University of Tennessee, Principal Trombone, Grant Park Orchestra
I was thrilled to have Timothy Smith visit the University of Tennessee for a recital/master class this past year.  His solo performance was musical, expressive, and a pure joy to experience.  His recital represented a wonderfully artistic encounter; creative programming coupled with beautiful playing and effective stage presence.  The master class following the recital was equally impressive.  Tim was able to successfully interact on a personal degree with every one of my students who played for him, and take them to the next level in their playing.  His comments, suggestions, and challenges echoed throughout the entire UT Trombone Studio for the rest of the semester.  I look forward to Tim’s next visit to the University of Tennessee with great eagerness.  I know he will again help move the studio another step ahead in great music making!”

Christian Carichner
Assistant Professor of Tuba and Euphonium, University of Central Arkansas
Brass Caption Head, Phantom Regiment
“Tim was an outstanding guest artist for our inaugural Low Brass Festival at UCA.  Not only was he an extremely flexible and low-stress guest artist to coordinate with (which is always appreciated!), but Tim provided OUTSTANDING information and music for all the participants in the festival.  He was engaged in every aspect of the festival, and went out of his way to work with interested students.  He provided valuable suggestions to teachers and players alike, and was just a wonderful person to work with.  It should not go unmentioned that most importantly, his playing was remarkable.  I have had the unique opportunity to be a fly-on-the-wall for Tim’s entire career, and each and every time I hear him play I am inspired to hit the practice room because of his sheer artistry and dedication to his craft.  I can’t recommend Tim highly enough for a visit to your school!!!”

Dr Brad Edwards
Associate Professor of Trombone, University of South Carolina School of Music

“During his visit, Timothy Smith gave an excellent presentation to the undergraduate students.  Using an engaging mix of humor and common sense, he spoke authoritatively about the Do’s and Don’t’s of developing a career.  He really connected with a student audience of over 200, offering sound advice from his own experiences.  I was impressed with his ability to hold their attention and inspire them to think about the larger picture beyond the four walls of the music school.  His message will resonate with any young musician striving to build a career.”

Thomas Kline

Director of Music Admission and Preparatory Programs, Ithaca College
“Mr. Smith was effective in engaging our students and the feedback from his discussion was very positive. I would highly recommend Mr. Smith to other music programs who are seeking to educate their students about the challenges and rewards of pursuing a career in music.”

James Olin
Co-Prinicpal Trombone, Baltimore Symphony OrchestraProfessor, The Peabody Institute

“Tim performed stunningly in a program which included the risky Leopold Mozart Concerto, the  virtuosic “Basta” and several rarely heard art songs of Schubert. Equally impressive was Tim’s caring and thoughtful approach coaching students on orchestral excerpts and trombone quartets. Bravo, Tim!”

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One thought on “Clinics & Recitals

  1. Having attended the Peabody symposium as an observer, I can attest to the fact that it was a great experience for all the participants. I thought the recital couldn’t be beat … until the Master Class commenced; it was even more impressive!

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